Stepping into The Storm

Matthew 14:28–29 (ESV) … “And Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat and walked on the water and came to Jesus.”


(Matthew 14:28, 29) The most famous part of this storm on the sea is Peter’s walking on the water.


• The desire for the stepping. “Peter … said, Lord if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water” (Matthew 14:28). Peter’s desire is often criticized but Christ never criticized it. It is, in fact, a noble desire. One can see that in two obvious ways. First, the condition of the desire. “If it be thou.” This condition is noble, Peter was not interested in walking on water unless he was going to Christ. Second, the courage in the desire. “Bid me come unto thee on the water.” He did not say “come unto thee in the boat” but “on the water.” That spoke of courage. Peter was not only willing to walk on water but to walk on water during the storm, for the storm did not cease until Peter and Christ got back to the boat (Matthew 14:32).


• The directive for the stepping. “And he said, Come.” (Matthew 14:29). Christ gave Peter the directive to walk on the water. First, the endorsing in the directive. “Come.” Do not criticize Peter for walking on the water. He did so only when Christ commanded, not before. It was not a presumptuous walk but a permitted walk. Second, the empowering in the directive. God’s commands come with God’s enablement. Peter was empowered by Christ to walk on the water. That empowering would not have come had Peter jumped out of the boat and tried walking on the water on his own will. Third, the encouragement in the directive. “Peter … walked on the water.” This amazing feat by Peter is an encouragement to all in Christ’s service. If our work looks impossible, remember Christ can enable us to do the impossible.[1]




[1] Butler, J. G. (2008). Analytical Bible Expositor: Matthew (p. 252). Clinton, IA: LBC Publications.

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