Our Lord Delivers

Psalm 35:10 (ESV) … “All my bones shall say, ‘O Lord, who is like you, delivering the poor from him who is too strong for him, the poor and needy from him who robs him?’”


In this psalm, David followed each of his three requests with a song of praise to the Lord (vv. 9–10, 17–18 and 27–28), showing that his great desire was to magnify Him. David’s joy was in God’s salvation, for which only God could receive the glory.


His whole being (“all my bones”; see 51:8) would give thanks and praise to the Lord. “Who is like you?” (v. 10) reminds us of Israel’s triumph song after The Exodus (Ex. 15:11). David knew that God had chosen him to be king of Israel and that his greatest task would be to unite and strengthen the kingdom and lead the people back to God. Israel had an important work to do in the world and David’s leadership was essential.


David’s experience reminds us of Jesus Christ, the Son of David, who was also hated without a cause (John 15:25) and falsely accused and attacked by those for whom He had shown nothing but kindness. God delivered David from his enemies, but the Father “spared not his own son” (Rom. 8:32) but willingly gave Him to die for the sins of the world.[1]


We can apply the words of this psalm to the devil, for he is described in Scripture precisely as David describes his enemies. He is our great foe, “a roaring lion looking for someone to devour” (1 Peter 5:8) and a slanderous “accuser of our brothers” (Rev. 12:10). We are like helpless sheep before this powerful enemy. But, thank God, we have a powerful champion and advocate in King Jesus. It is not wrong for us to pray for his help for the confounding of Satan’s devices and to rejoice in anticipation of the devil’s ultimate and certain fall.[2]




[1] Wiersbe, W. W. (2004). Be worshipful (1st ed., p. 138). Colorado Springs, CO: Cook Communications Ministries.

[2] Boice, J. M. (2005). Psalms 1–41: An Expositional Commentary (p. 306). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

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